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post #16 of (permalink) Old 06-21-2005, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Dru

Keeping your food in your car is a good way to teach bears that breaking into cars gets them fed. Lots of bears in Yosemite know how to break into cars now thanks to people storing food in the car.
They've been training bears in Yosimite to be conditioned to humans and how to get their food for years and years, though. Parent bears actually teach baby bears how to do it. Up here, as a general rule, the bears haven't quite figured out how to use the slim jim...

Keeping food locked in the trunk of your car is recommended at many (one could almost say most, but that would be assuming too much) Provincial Parks in BC. As a PFO, I had three things that I told People. 1) We have never had a problem here with bears, and we don't intend to. Don't keep anything that smells like food in your tent; keep it in your vehicle. 2) Firewood is free here. Don't go nuts. Keep the fires small. 3) We collect depositable recycling. Don't throw it in the trash. Put it at the end of your picnic table when you leave.

Don't believe me? Here's an excerpt from the Bear People Conflict Plan from BC Parks:

Most frontcountry campers are expected to provide some type of secure food storage (e.g.,the trunk of vehicles). Coolers left unattended in the open are not secure from bears. Food storage lockers have been installed in some campsites where the level of bear-people incidents indicates they are needed. For example, steel lockers have been installed in Mount Robson Provincial Park at four different sites (H. Mulyk, pers. commun. 2001) and at Meziadin Lake Provincial Park where grizzly habitat is adjacent to the campground (H. Markides, pers. commun., 2001). This also benefits campers travelling without secure food storage capabilities (cyclists, hikers, etc.). Other methods of bear-proof food storage
include secure, small buildings, elevated caches and canisters (see also Backcountry areas).

Yes, that is not the case everywhere, but I would hope that those places that it is an exception (Mount Robson, Yosemite), they will provide you with the appropriate alternative.

As I said earlier, there were a couple of times when I confiscated people's food (and dirty dishes) because they hadn't secured it before leaving, even after I explained it to them. I gave it back when they got back. Better me than a bear. And if a bear associates food with campsite, they'll figure out the lovely smell coming from this vehicle is food, and that's when you have serious problems.

My favourite story was about a tenter who woke up, heard something outside her tent. She unzipped the window to see a mamma black bear and two cubs on the other side of the campsite...eating fireweed. They hadn't learned to associate food with campsites (other than the fireweed grows better at the edge of the clearing), or to associate cars with food.

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post #17 of (permalink) Old 06-25-2005, 03:13 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for all the great <beer> er I mean advice. I've got me a tent and a wicked sleeping bag. My next question is, besides the beer, what other kinds of provisions are good to take. Besides water and juice. What other kinds of foods do y'all like to take with you when camping. A buddy of mine is bringing all the meat etc for the BBQ so I don't have to worry about making sure the meat stays cool etc. On my day hikes I just take food that will stay good for a day without getting spoiled. But since this is going to be a three-day thing I figure I should not take things that will get spoiled quickly. Food suggestions ppl! Once again you all rock!
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post #18 of (permalink) Old 06-27-2005, 10:00 AM
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If you have a cooler with you? Bring whatever you like. As long as it doesn't need to be microwaved....

Bring along something to cook with. You could cook over the fire, but that can be tough, esp. for a newbie. You can bring along a full-on BBQ, but a table-top one will probably be easier to transport. I've got a coleman propane stove that I take along when I'm travelling with my wife (I don't usually eat a lot of hot food when camping, even when cartop camping).

Try and bring along food that fits how you're cooking. If you're only bringing along a BBQ, don't bring along stuff that needs to be boiled. You can BBQ corn-on-the cob, and if you have the correct insert, you can BBW pizza. There are BBQ cookbooks out there that'll give you lots of ideas.

That said, bring along food that's easy to cook, at least for your first couple of trips. I know backpackers who can fashion an oven out of a backpacking stove and a couple pieces of tinfoil, but many people have issues just boiling water while cartop camping.

Make sure you have appropriate cooking gear (pots, pans) for what you're planning on making, as well as all utensils, seasonings, etc. You are going to be self-sufficiant here, and you can't just go to the cupboard for salt if you need it.

And have a good supply of food that doesn't neeed to be cooked, just in case your BBQ/Coleman's stove/whateveryouhave doesn't work.

Even when cartopping, the less cooking I do, the better. However, I have been known to take along an electric kettle, sneaking into the bathroom (or into an unoccupied powered site), making myself up a potful of KD, and then taking off again.

Sorry this is rambling, but it is a wide open question.


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post #19 of (permalink) Old 06-27-2005, 10:56 AM
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As for food I find anything "just add water" is the easiest (ie. cup of noodles or even lipton sidekicks). It'll save you from being forced to bring the cooler for milk or other perishables (though I do enjoy the very occasional hot dog feast). I'm really strange about clean up though (I HATE washing dishes at camp) so I've somewhat mastered the "backpacking foods" at camp. Less to pack, and usually easier to cook. If you can stand the weight, canned foods are quick and easy as well (think canned meat and flour tortillas).

When I first started car camping, I brought WAAAAYYY too much stuff. You learn quickly. lol!
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