AT Boots - ClubTread Community
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post #1 of (permalink) Old 11-01-2008, 10:01 PM Thread Starter
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AT Boots

I'm just starting to get into touring, and am still buying all the gear. Money is an issue, and as such I was wondering how necessary it is to have the AT boots. Will I find it to be too unbearable to go without the walk setting, or will I at least be able to make it through a couple of trips?
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 11-01-2008, 10:02 PM
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Only one way to find out eh.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 11-01-2008, 10:11 PM
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That's why MEC can be so great. You can head on over and rent a pair of AT boots for a day or for a weekend, and compare it with whatever else. It's helped me make some good choices in the past.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 11-01-2008, 10:20 PM Thread Starter
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quote:Originally posted by platypus

That's why MEC can be so great. You can head on over and rent a pair of AT boots for a day or for a weekend, and compare it with whatever else. It's helped me make some good choices in the past.
Rent; good call.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2008, 11:20 AM
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You do NOT need AT boots. I tour in the backcountry over 30-40 days in the winter and still use my Salomon X-wave 8 boots. I do not release the buckles at all but find I usually set my climbing plaforms one higher than most with AT boots. Good AT boots are not that much lighter than DH boots and if they are they usually suck if your use to a good DH boot. If you really want to drop the weight of a DH boot and make it better for multi days then buy and intuition liner, which is lighter and does not accept water so stays warmer over successive days.

When my girlfriend and I arrived at Sol Mountain last year some group was looking at us funny with our downhill boots and asking us questions and worrying that we were going to slow them down...they we quite surprised after the 2 and 3 rd day when they were dropping behind and we were fresh...fitness is the evener out in the backcountry....
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2008, 06:32 PM
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dave - it's not just the fitness factor. Bear in mind you are fit so your view is coloured. You are right that fitness and time in the field is the major evener but here's my perspective.

Alpine boots suck for overnights - the PU plastic in alpines get stiffer as it gets cold. Not a factor if you have a warm place to camp or a hut to retreat too but a major pain in the ass in a cold snowcave or a tent and you are putting on the boots again the next day.

No vibram sole on alpine boots; major downside for scrambling and hiking. AT boots also suck for hiking but alpine boots really really suck.

No walk mode in alpine boots. Some people don't mind it. I can't stand not having a walk mode.

Biggest downside. Can't use Dynafits with an alpine boot but then I'm biased.

All commentary aside, the Intuition liner is the best thing to happen to a skiers feet since comfortable socks.

You can get a used AT boot; get a new liner and be just fine. Used AT boots - $ 200 bucks or so; Intuition liners - $ 150 or so.


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post #7 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2008, 09:38 PM
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Of course you can get by with alpine boots. It just depends on how well the ones you have will work for you. If you wear your shin raw or blister than a boot more suited to walking may be necessary.

I think the biggest thing you gain from the walk mode is a longer stride length which makes a big difference in efficiency. Some people swear by using the smallest riser possible for this same reason. If there is a lot of traversing or flats your quads will thank you for being able to straighten your knee. I did a couple of split board trips and the forward lean of my boots really did a number on my quads.

Since I went straight from snowboarding to Dynafit I don't have any experience with modern ski boots. Many make do with alpine boots in trekers. Apparently AT bindings are a huge improvement over that. AT boots span everything from 3 buckle super light to essentially an alpine boot with a walk mode. You have to choose your compromise.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 11-02-2008, 11:11 PM
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Walking down a logging road in a downhill boot would really suck.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 11-03-2008, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by sgregory

I'm just starting to get into touring, and am still buying all the gear. Money is an issue, and as such I was wondering how necessary it is to have the AT boots. Will I find it to be too unbearable to go without the walk setting, or will I at least be able to make it through a couple of trips?
It really depends what kind of "touring" you are talking about. For lift assisted slack country, DH boots will be fine, but AT boots will be lighter and more comfortable. For tours with a significant horizontal component I wouldn't recommend it without trying it on a low commitment trip first.

I've never skied AT in DH boots myself but I've been touring with people on that sort of setup. For some, it's fine. For others their feet get eaten by the boots.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 11-03-2008, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
quote:Originally posted by LeeL

get a new liner and be just fine. Used AT boots - $ 200 bucks or so; Intuition liners - $ 150 or so.


Another vote for intuition liners. To top it off, service is excellent.

Without the comfy intuition liners, it would have been a pain to hike in those AT boots, like my recent trip to Cerise creek.
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